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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
't need because of the change in the geopolitical environment the stealthy helicopter or the high end artillery. based on what you're seeing in the geopolitical situation, what does that mean future investment. what should be we investing in what should we continue to buy more of? less of. are there vampire programs with using your phraseologies that should be cut? what is the geopolitical environment mean for investment? >> well, again, my friends in the army are mad at me. unfortunately, i think there is here a shift what was the phrase bob used longer, large, basically large prolonged -- [inaudible conversations] >> yeah. that's a good prediction today. who in august of 2001 reconduct -- predicted we would have one in afghanistan? i think it's a dangerous thing in the business. it seems to me to that we needs to strengthen our maritime capability in the western pacific and not to contain china or fight a war with china, god for bid. i think the goal has got to be to try to sustain the peaceful situation, which is only thirty years old. it's the -- we have a huge interest, i think,
in the ecosystem. >> basically it's come to this. the environment where these pythons now live is not used to them. these creatures have evolved from places like the rainforest in southeast asia or the african savannah, and the habitat or the grassland habitat that you find in the everglades just simply is not equipped to deal with these very new and very invasive species. basically these pythons are invaders, and they are eating everything they come in contact with. >> you say these very new, are these pythons that were people's pets? >> likely that's how all of this originated. pot past 30 years people have been importing these snakes. a lot less lately. but during the 1970s and 1980s thousands and thousands of these snakes were brought in from asia and africa, and more often than not they either escaped because of hurricanes or people released them into environments where they shouldn't have, and these animals took over. they started out as pets, and then through negligence were released and, unfortunately, this ecosystem just really is not prepared to take on what these snakes do to the enviro
a short break. if you feel like you work in a toxic environment but don't know what to do about it -- how is that for a segue? ken linder written a new book called "your killer emotions." best way to navigate your way is to keep emotions in check. we'll talk to him, up next. geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> everybody has a moment where you get upset and you do something you regret. our next guest says he knows how to control those urges and lead to a successful personally at work. he has a new book "your killer emotions: seven steps to mastering the toxic impulses that sabotage you." good morning. >> good morning, soledad. >> i'm guessing you work with hostile people on both sides of the negotiation and there are lots of people who think anger and emot
, patty murray, borba boxer, chair of the environment. we have seven women now on the democratic side that are ranking members, and on the republican sign, every major committee is led by a white mail. in -- white male. in fact there's only one woman chairing a minor committee, and they fav her administration. what does this mean? women's leadership changes the conversation at these negotiations tables. there's a story of serving on the house armed services committee, and when they were talking about military reddiness, she and women like gabby giffords were there to ask questions about personnel and supplies, but also about mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. all of which is important for military readiness. and so you can't tell me that if we had two or three women involved in this fiscal cliff debate in the last month, that we wouldn't have gotten it done faster. i was at home over the holidays with my dad, and we all knew where we would end up. there were going to be tax increases. may have been at 300,000 or 4 hon thousand. there wasn't an american i
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
on some gun measures. what's clear here is the political environment in washington, we've seen over the last several months, how it's been very difficult to get movement on anything that goes down to the wire for lawmakers to come up with some sort of bipartisan agreement. what the vice president is spelling out here, is floating, essentially he's talking about the reality of the current political climate here in washington. yes, there are things that can be done legislatively. but if those things can't be done, then the president is willing to act alone. why? because he says it's time to act no now. >> i want to make it clear that we are not going to get caught up in the notion, unless we can do everything we'll do nothing. it's critically important that we act. >> in addition to these meetings that you spelled out earlier that the vice president is holding today, yesterday he also met with some faith leaders. they talked about the moral imperative to act quickly. he also had a conference call with governors, other stated and local officials across the country. they're really tryin
. >> reporter: still, some conservative christians say the focus shouldn't be on guns, but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school. getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said he's glad that evangelical groups participated in his meetings because in the past, they have been reluctant to engage on the gun issue." athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> time for a little introduction. i want you to take a look here. this is my cat, browser. he's at home right now watching the show, no doubt. but he's pretty cute and cuddly. i spoil him rotten, but could he be plotting something sinister? could he be plotting to kill me? doesn't look like it there. we'll talk about it next with the author of "how to tell if your cat is trying to kill you." about health care... s i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
in this environment. they were supposed to be gamestop's salvation, instead down more than 15%. can you believe that? that seems like maybe management is -- they're not ready for this. maybe they don't have as good of a handle on things as they think. plus the new video game consoles that bulls are excited about do get released, they might include technology that makes it so only the original user could play that game. that would be something, right? beyond the ailing used game business, gamestop plans to grow the digital business, selling games over the internet, dramatically over the next couple of years. but, i don't see how they compete against more established online players. fact is, gamestop has to compete with amazon on way too many fronts. they sell the same gaming hardware and software, does digital down loads too, letting you buy and download games online, amazon's on fire here and they do it really well. and amazon makes it easy to find and buy used video games by connecting you with vendors and individuals all over the world who want to sell. you don't want to be in competition with ama
and get some of the issues out of the way. >> we've lived in this environment for the last 18 months, one big disaster after another. everyone is waiting for the policy response, comes at the 11th hour and 59th minute. this is a pattern everyone has gotten used to but the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling are the last big tail risks we think of the tail risks that we have to worry about, saw we would say once we get past that over the next several months we think it will lift a little bit of a cloud and investors will take risks. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> bob, thanks to you as well. ten minutes to go before we close it up. the dow jones industrial average holding on to a gain of 50 points. >> well, this herbalife soap opera is continuing. herb greenberg is coming up. all over the big move in the stock. take a look. up 3.25% right now. we'll show you what's behind it. >> and can you believe the iphone was only introduced five years ago? it is true. five years ago today, in fact, so here's a trivia question for you. the iphone alone is wort
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
on wall street to be concerned. but we're not really in a political environment, brooke, where the -- neither the white house nor most people are concerned with whether or not wall street likes the pick. but he is -- he's a guy who had experience. he was involved in the 1997 balanced budget deal. he's been involved in social security legislation. all the topics that are hot right now, jack lew does have experience with. >> you mentioned sequestration, of course. we have a couple of fiscal cliffs over the next two months. do we have any idea what kind of negotiator he'll be and he'll drive a tough bargain with the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> as the chief of staff of the white house, that's a key issue. you got to be able to be tough, you got to be able to negotiate. if you were grading the white house and its negotiating abilities in the last few months, you may not give them a very high grade. what you get in jack lew is a guy who is highly, specifically familiar with the budgeting process. i wouldn't normally say this, that that's the most important thing a treasury
in a political environment, brooke, where the -- neither the white house nor most people are concerned with whether or not wall street likes the pick. but he is -- he's a guy who had experience. he was involved in the 1997 balanced budget deal. he's been involved in social security legislation. all the topics that are hot right now, jack lew does have experience with. >> you mentioned sequestration, of course. we have a couple of fiscal cliffs over the next two months. do we have any idea what kind of negotiator he'll be and he'll drive a tough bargain with the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> as the chief of staff of the white house, that's a key issue. you got to be able to be tough, you got to be able to negotiate. if you were grading the white house and its negotiating abilities in the last few months, you may not give them a very high grade. what you get in jack lew is a guy who is highly, specifically familiar with the budgeting process. i wouldn't normally say this, that that's the most important thing a treasury secretary needs to do, regulation is another big area. but r
medicare. it's about the environment. you talked about going on vacation and coming back and hearing the same thing. we're talking about the same thing from '95 as we are today. we haven't really decided yet what type of country we want to be and how we want to spend the money in order to get there. we spend a great deal of money on education. we probably spend more money per student than any other industrialized nations. yet when you look at the collective global testing, we're somewhere in the middle of the pack. so the conversation we need to be having isn't just about how much money or how are we spending that money, and is this moving us towards the type of country we want to be? >> that's much too complicated. i'm just kidding. >> this is the point. this is the debate. there has to be a debate. we're going to debate how we spend our money. we're now talking about when we have the debates. we should be having it in the traditional manner in which the governments operate. if we don't, we're going to be dealing with these cliffs. >> that's right. we shouldn't wait until the last m
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
that schools are structured environment and frankly, little girl's behavior, a willingness to sit still, pay attention, not necessarily to talk and get up and run around the room is more conducive to a classroom setting. what we've done, trying to turn little boys into different forms of little girls and a lot has to do with the way that schools are structured. you take a six-year-old and sit him in a chair and expect that they're going to stay there. it isn't natural, frankly, it isn't natural for a lot of little girls, it's more for the convenience of teachers than it is accommodating to the child's needs. >> that's truly right. little boys are savages, i don't mean that in-- it's just true. >> we can't change it, but thr he' lovable and grow up to warm, wonderful human beings when they get a little older. >> tucker: amen. on that hopeful note. coming up, get an instant mood boost from botox. true, that story coming up and women all around put it on every day, but one woman gave herself a no makeup challenge for a year, claims it made her more beautiful. is this a good lesson in vanity for
there is cognitive behavioral therapy. mind physicalness. sleep environment. make sure you take an hour before you go to sleep at night to wind down. make sure the environment is dark and cool. 65 to 75-degrees is best. >> a cooler room? >> cooler room. i write something down in a journal? what's that do? >> you can't solve the problems of the day in the middle of the night. write it down. you will forget what you're up thinking about at night. write it down. reach out to a friend or sleep specialist. >> doctor are you are a sleep specialist have you ever taken a sleeping pill. >> no, i never have. >> what's your technique? >> mike, unfortunately all of us, you included we have some demands and expectations, irregular schedules but it's like diet. sometimes you go out and you are with colleagues and you will eat that cheese cake. you don't do testify single day. you follow these simple rules. the journal and keeping a regular schedule is so important. it really is is. >> is scotch in there anywhere? no? >> some people are using it but with the ambien it would be a problem. >> don't do that? >> don't
environment. the food is brought to them. so they actually harm the stability of the dog. dogs love to work for what he has. that's why i suggest exercised discipline, that affects your body, mind and heart. >> this is all your philosophy. it's building on your -- it's less about a formula, but more than philosophy -- >> the excuse, i believe. >> 43 years of knowledge that i -- people want to know. what do i do with a barking dog. here it is. page whatever it is. people want solutions. people want it quick. >> i hope thunder is not listening here. the issue of stupid dogs. what about dogs who eat clothing? hypothetically. >> hypothetically. who like eat, say, my daughter's under wear. perverted -- >> they don't have a proper outlet. they do behaviors that appear stupid to people. >> is it because he's a apartment dog? >> it's because he doesn't have the proper challenge, like sheep herding dogs live in the city, they have a tendency to go after bikes and kids and things. they don't have the proper outlet. >> what's the proper outlet for dogs that eat stupid things. >> i need to follow this.
the environment for sleep conducive to sleep, but in addition to that, doctors are getting very little education on sleep. and they're not addressing the sleep the way they need to. and so unfortunately when patients come to see physicians, what happens is they'll dispense sleeping pills and never get at the root cause. so if you get at the root cause, you can help a patient solve these problems and sleeping pills were never meant to be used for more than four to six weeks. after four to six weeks, you really want to be transitioning off the pills and using other modalities to help you sleep. >> that's scary to think of the things you can forget if you take this pill. so many people take it. dr. carol ashe, thanks so much. >> thank you for having me, brooke. >>> hundreds of amateur snake hunters from all over the world are heading to the florida everglades. they have machetes. they have guns. this is the first competition of its kind, folks, it's a python hunt. for one month here, a contest starting tomorrow, drawn in 500 people, more than a thousand bucks up for grabs for the person who catches
environment. >> sergeant cindy west from the wing county sheriff's department joins me on the phone from seattle. so, sergeant, thank you for calling in. i understand that authorities initially have been using cell phone pings trying to locate him. are you getting any sign from him whatsoever? >> i'm sorry. i can barely hear you. i think we have a bad connection. >> sergeant, can you hear me now? >> oh, this is never fun on live tv. cindy west, let me try one more time. let me ask about this man. >> i can hear you now. >> you do hear me. here's what i was asking. i know that folks in the sheriff's department using pings from the cell phone, trying to get a location. are you getting anything from him right now? >> no, unfortunately the pings we were getting from the cell phone were probably prior to the jump. we believe he either turned the cell phone off prior to the jump or after the jump it was damaged. and in keep in mind it doesn't give you an exact gps location, it gives you a general triangulation. based on that, the flight pattern of the helicopter, we narrowed it down to the area
because of the -- of an environment that says, anything goes. so there's a reason for regulations. not just to stifle business. the police we see on their corneres are an example of regulation. that same idea goes up and beyond that. the financial things as well. >> host: ken in atlanta, georgia. you're on the air. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen, this is just a treat. just a real pleasure to hear you and i've got some good news for you. right now, on youtube, there's a seven and a half minute film narrated by former president of georgia tech, incidentally georgia tech won the ball game the other day -- but georgia tech's president, the name of this film is, all american citizen team. and it is an effort that the georgia general assembly has been involved in since the 1970s, and we found out that there is a problem and it takes us back to a country western song, looking for love in all the wrong places. >> guest: one of our favorites. >> caller: we don't have problem with the government and we don't have a problem with elected officials. the problem turns out to be the folks
more than 461 planets where life might exist in a rocky environment. >>> a boeing 787 had a fire break out monday on a dreamliner that was parked at boston's logan airport. the empty plane has been in service for less than a month. a cleaning crew found the cabin filled with smoke. there were no injuries, and federal officials are investigating. >>> and the "new york post" says hillary clinton got a football helmet as a gag gift from her state department colleagues on her first day back to work monday after a concussion that caused a blood clot. a spokesman says "as you know washington is a contact sport." think they got a great sense of humor over there. >>> if you're making travel plans for this year fasten your seat belts. air fares and hotel prices are expected to rise again in 2013. cbs news travel editor peter greenberg is here with more of this year's good and the bad news travel trend. hello, mr. greenberg. >> hello, miss king. the bad news air fares. they'll go up between 8% and 12%. >> why? >> fewer airlines. consolidations mergers. we may see one ha
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)